• Staying motivated to study in the homestretch is never easy, especially when you're feeling that much closer to sun, fun and relaxation. But if you crumble now, you will not be a happy camper when you get your grades back this summer. Here are some ideas to keep you chugging along

  • Are you hunched over your keyboard? Are your wrists bent at unnatural angles? Do you feel pins and needles creeping from foot to calf? If you're currently experiencing any of these symptoms -- or have experienced them during a long study session, you're in luck: You'll never fall victim to your study space again! Just follow these tips to make studying more comfortable

  • If you prefer to work independently, you probably dread the occasional but inevitable … group project. But working in a group can be a great learning experience and not only when it comes to absorbing information: It's also a lesson in how to function productively with others. Here, how to deter others from screwing up when you need to make the grade

  • If your desk and computer are overcome with clutter, chances are your brain will feel cluttered when it's time to study. Instead of moving into the library to de-stress and study up, apply these desk-organizing strategies to make your own study space more conducive to actual studying

  • GPA is one of those dreaded acronyms that sticks long after college ends. It's a number that matters to hiring managers and grad school recruiters. So it'd better be in good shape. Here are five simple ways to keep your grades higher

  • Students still cheat. So what's behind this risk-taking behavior? A few instructors and professors have actually asked. Here's your cheat sheet to their findings on why college students cheat

  • Instead of relaxing on white, sandy beaches this spring break, thousands of college students will travel around the globe to volunteer for a variety of social justice causes. Known as 'alternative spring breaks,' these are public-service-oriented trips, planned and led by students, that focus on volunteerism and education about social justice issues in the United States or overseas.

  • Students are often told that getting to know teachers on a more personal level can add up to more academic insight, better grades and stellar reference letters. But there’s such a thing as crossing a line. Here, we map out the warning signs that you -- or an instructor -- may be entering dangerous territory, emotionally and academically.

  • Can't come up with the money for four years at a traditional college? What if you could take the same courses far more cheaply, experience life on a residential campus, and transfer smoothly after two years to complete your bachelor's degree at the university you thought you couldn't afford? That's the attraction of many community colleges.

  • Unemployment has changed many a kitchen-table conversation about college. One of the best ways to ensure a job is to have a bachelor's degree. But a college education is now more difficult for many families to afford. That means many students are on the prowl for bargain bachelor's degrees--and some are finding them in nontraditional programs such as three-year bachelor's degree programs, online education, and work colleges.

  • At the top of every college student's list are the modern tools of campus life, the technology that gets students through their academics and socializing. We've scanned five key categories of tech for collegiates. While these can be used for entertainment, the emphasis is on work and communications.

  • Even after a couple of years at a school, students often realize they might be better off at a different university. Whether you're looking for a financial, social or academic change, transferring can be a feasible option if your current university just isn't cutting it. Let's check out exactly what it takes to transfer from re-application to juggling credits

  • There have been dozens of incidents of crime on campus in recent years. It's a harsh reality on college campuses. So how prepared are you in the event that such a threat occurs at your school? And more important, how well-prepped is your college?

  • You might think that studying for a midterm is just like studying for anything else -- you might even opt to skip studying and just wing it. But, midterms can be just as challenging and important as finals. We asked students, alumni, and staff from a variety of schools across the country what advice they would give to those who are about to sit for midterms

  • Here are a handful of resources that you may not have discovered that go beyond the words and numbers of the college Web site and financial aid packets.

  • With just a few weeks left of summer vacay, why not make the most of the free time you have before going back to school? Instead of spending the rest of your summer lulling in a lounge chair and frying your skin (and brain), check out these alternative summer plans to keep you buzzing

  • Taking summer college classes while your friends are kicking back at the beach? Ugh, can you say 'buzzkill'? Whether you're trying to improve a grade or get ahead, tackling summer classes might actually trump that sweet golden glow. Luckily, we're servin' up tips for surviving summer college classes

  • Sleeping until the wee hours of the afternoon and clocking in hours of TV marathons can seem tempting after a year's worth of school work. However, a recent study found that students of all ages actually experience learning loss if they don't engage in educational activities during the summer. So, consider these suggestions for summertime

  • Struggling with whether or not to join a fraternity or sorority? Check out the pros and cons of becoming a pledge -- from those who have been there.

  • There are tons of cool opportunities out there for college kids, and if you’re looking to land something for spring or summer, the time to start looking is now. But do you really need an internship?

  • Living on a shoestring budget? Whether your parents float you funds or you're pulling a part-time paying gig, here's how to stretch every precious penny and 17 painless ways to get major bang for your buck

  • Going green is no longer a fad: It's a way of life. There are many ways you can help make campus life greener. Aside from turning off lights (compact fluorescent bulbs, of course), unplugging appliances and taking shorter showers, here are some other easy ways for you to conserve.

  • Math is your thing? Cha-ching! Turns out the 15 bachelor's degrees with the highest starting salaries have a common denominator: They're all math-related. Here's the complete list of the 15 highest earning majors

  • Robert Zemsky, chairman of the Learning Alliance for Higher Education at the University of Pennsylvania and author of Making Reform Work: The Case for Transforming American Higher Education, is advocating for major changes on university campuses -- most notably a three-year college program.

  • You could waste four years studying a foundering field. Or, find out right here what careers (and majors) are still worth pursuing during times of economic stress. Here, we relay the best Recession-safe careers so you can declare a major now that will set you up for success later.

  • Are you registered for an honors class or teetering on the edge of 'I'm too freakin' lazy to challenge myself'? Before you 'yay' or 'nay' the big league, you need the inside info to decide if the honors track or an honors course is worth the extra work -- and whether you can take the heat.

  • Rhodes Scholarships are seen as investments in individuals, rather than in, say, highbrow research proposals. But that doesn't mean getting a scholarship is easy. Each year, the 32 American Rhodes scholars are culled from an initial pool of roughly 1,500 undergraduates and recent college grads. Here's some information to get you started