Pets | Dogs and the Workplace
Dogs and the Workplace

by Stacey Brecher

Here are some things to consider if you'd like to bring your own pooch to work with you

The sad eyes. The droopy face. The moping. Let's face it -- you probably hate leaving your dog in the morning to go to work just as much as he hates being left.

What if you could avoid all that, and instead bring your dog along with you when you head to the office?

Bringing your dog with you to work isn't just about the fun of having him with you throughout the day - the benefits to having a dog in the workplace have been scientifically proven. For example, a study by Central Michigan University found that when dogs are present in a group, employees are more likely to trust each other and collaborate more effectively in the office. Dogs can also help break the ice when it comes to communication between co-workers.

Greg Kleva, a celebrity dog behavioral therapist/master trainer for Bark Busters Home Dog Training in New Jersey, explains how mood-boosting chemicals increase when dogs are around. "Interactions with dogs have been proven to increase levels of oxytocin, often referred to as the 'feel good' hormone," Kleva said. "Studies have shown that the presence of dogs in the workplace may also reduce stress hormone (cortisol) levels for their owners. These same studies indicate that cortisol levels for workers who didn't bring their dogs to work were drastically higher by the end of the working day."

In fact, many places have been using canine companions to provide therapeutic relief for years now. "Look no further than your local rest home, hospital, library, elementary school, etc to see dogs being utilized for their therapeutic value," Kleva says. "Dogs are also often seen in disaster zones and courtrooms to help calm those in traumatizing situations."

For employers, the fact that having canine companions around increases productivity makes it a plus for them as well. "Dogs have the ability to break down the barriers that keep humans from interacting with one another," explains Kleva. "We find it much easier to chat with someone we don't know quite as well if we approach them to meet their dog."

Of course there will be some prep involved if you're thinking of bringing your dog with you to work. "Start by training your dog to greet people appropriately by teaching him to sit while greeting, rather than jumping up," suggests Kleva. Other basic commands like 'come', 'stay', 'leave it', and 'go to bed' should be mastered as well, and you'll need to make sure he can ignore distractions. You can practice by bringing him to the park, where there are a lot of distractions, and making him pay attention to your commands.

It's also important to make sure your dog is both physically and mentally stimulated to keep him calm and to reduce boredom prior to entering your workspace. This will make the experience better for your dog and everyone in the office.

Be sure to have the right supplies on hand if you're bringing your dog along with you to the office, as well. A leash is the most important thing to have, as it can be used for walks, as well as keeping him under your control. "Since bringing your dog to the office can be a stressful experience for your dog and cause him apprehension, bring your dog's pillow or blanket from home so he has something familiar to comfort him," says Kleva. "Also help your dog stay entertained by bringing along dog puzzle toys that make him work to earn a treat. Bring food or treats and a water bowl so your dog can stay well hydrated, too."

There may be some drawbacks that come with bringing your dog to the office, too. The most obvious is that a co-worker may be allergic. Be sure to check with everyone in the office before you bring your dog in and put someone's health in danger.

You should also be on the lookout for accidents, and it will be your responsibility to ensure your dog does not ruin any equipment in the office. Barking or aggression can be off-putting to office mates, as well, and the additional time added to an already hectic work schedule to tend to your dog's needs throughout the day may upset coworkers. Trying your dog out at the office for a half day may a good way to determine if it's a good fit for your dog's personality, as well as for everyone else in the office.

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